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News

8/2/16

 

Read this in Español or 中文

 

August 2, 2016

 

Dear SFUSD Families:  

 

I am writing to you on behalf of all of my colleagues on the SFUSD Board of Education.

 

Given the news of Superintendent Richard A. Carranza’s likely departure to serve as Houston’s new superintendent, the Board of Education has moved swiftly to ensure a smooth transition and continued positive momentum for our district.

 

While we begin the community process of searching for a new superintendent to serve our district, the Board of Education is united in choosing Deputy Superintendent Myong Leigh as SFUSD’s interim superintendent.

 

Mr. Leigh has been with SFUSD since 2000 and has successfully managed day-to-day operations and overseen key district initiatives. Our district has tremendous leadership throughout our schools and central offices. Mr. Leigh will be working with a great team at SFUSD.  

 

We are grateful to have had Superintendent Carranza at the helm for the past seven years--four as superintendent and three as a deputy. Under his leadership, SFUSD has maintained a focus on students’ academic growth through effective common-core aligned teaching and learning while also developing students’ social, emotional and physical well being. Our teachers and other have received more resources to do their critical work, including greater compensation, professional learning opportunities and access to technology.

 

The board takes seriously our responsibility to ensure the most capable and qualified leader for our school district moving forward. In the near future there will be a public meeting to discuss a selection process for the next superintendent of schools. Our national search process will be inclusive, transparent, and thorough.  

 

Without a doubt, we will prioritize finding a leader who shares our vision for ensuring every graduate is ready to succeed in college and careers. We will prioritize someone who has a track record of leading around our enduring goals of student achievement, access, equity, and accountability. And we will seek someone who can work with you and our entire community to move our district closer to our vision.

 

As we embark on the search for a new leader for SFUSD, input from our families is critical. Please check our website, sfusd.edu, for updates on future public meetings where the Board will gather input on the superintendent search and selection process.

 

All our school administrators are looking forward to greeting you and your children back to school on August 15.


 

Sincerely,  

 

Matt Haney

President, SF Board of Education

more

Meet Kristina Rizga

the author of "Mission High"

on Monday, August 29th at 7 PM

at Folio Books

(on 24th Street between Sanchez and Noe)


The Odd Mondays Series at Folio Books
Monday, August 29th 7 PM  
3957 24th Street, San Francisco
MISSION HIGH
One School, How Experts Tried To Faill It
And The Students and Teachers Who Made It Triumph
by Kristina Rizga
FREE ADMISSION
 When education journalist Kristina Rizga first met Darrell at Mission High School, he was taking AP calculus class, writing a ten-page research paper, and had received several college acceptance letters. And Darrell was not an exception. More than 80 percent of Mission High seniors go to college every year, even though the school teaches large numbers of English learners and students from poor families.
  So, why has the federal government been threatening to close Mission High—and schools like it across the country?
 The United States has been on a century-long road toward increased standardization in our public schools, which resulted in a system that reduces the quality of education to primarily one metric: standardized test scores. According to this number, Mission High is a “low-performing” school even though its college enrollment, graduation, attendance rates and student surveys are some of the best in the country.
  The qualities that matter the most in learning—skills like critical thinking, intellectual engagement, resilience, empathy, self-management, and cultural flexibility—can’t be measured by multiple-choice questions designed by distant testing companies, Rizga argues, but they can be detected by skilled teachers in effective, personalized and humane classrooms that work for all students, not just the most motivated ones.
  Based on four years of reporting with unprecedented access, the unforgettable, intimate stories in these pages throw open the doors to America’s most talked about—and arguably least understood—public school classrooms where the largely invisible voices of our smart, resilient students and their committed educators can offer a clear and hopeful blueprint for what it takes to help all students succeed.

 “This book is a godsend… a moving portrait for anyone wanting to go beyond the  simplified labels and metrics and really understand an urban high school, and its highly individual, resilient, eager and brilliant students and educators.” 
                   —Dave Eggers, co-founder, 
                       826 National and ScholarMatch

“You shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you odd.”  – Flannery O’Connor

Consider joining us for a no-host pizza/salad or other entré dinner ($15-20), 5:30 p.m. at the Haystack Pizza 
Restaurant, south side of 24th near Sanchez Street. The 24 line and the 48 line and the J Church 
are the nearby Muni transportation lines available. 

Congratulations, Carlos!

Mission High Junior Carlos Sanchez had his artwork selected for this year's Carnaval poster.  Congratulations, Carlos!

 

Carnaval San Francisco 2016 Poster
 


Carlos and his poster
 

Calendar

Romeo and Juliet mini-opera